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Does ArcGIS Pro join to excel worksheets like ArcMap does?

Does ArcGIS Pro join to excel worksheets like ArcMap does?


I love the idea of ArcGIS Pro, especially for non-GIS analysts to get one-off maps done easily and quickly.

The big question is: Does ArcGIS Pro join to excel worksheets like ArcMap does?


At this time ArcGIS Pro cannot see or use Excel spreadsheets. This functionality might be added later, but I haven't seen any firm indication of when that might be. It is currently in Pre-release and due to come out with ArcGIS 10.3.


Yes it does now but it's not as robust (compared to mapinfo which does this very easily). See https://community.esri.com/groups/esri-training/blog/2017/05/26/working-with-excel-data-in-arcgis-pro


More Power for Your GIS Analysis through Joining Features to ArcGIS Online

by JosephKerski

Because the problems that GIS analysts work on such as biodiversity loss and water quality do not stop at disciplinary or political boundaries, the ability to connect the map or attribute table that you are working on to another map or table in the same geodatabase or another geodatabase is powerful. One way of doing this is to join features. This has been a core function and a chief argument for the use of GIS for decades. But with the advent of ArcGIS , including its Join Features tool along with data layers in the Living Atlas of the World, the ability that you have at your fingertips for joining features just became a lot more powerful. I first saw a demonstration of this at the Esri User Conference from my colleague Jennifer Bell and I thought, "this is a fantastic capability for educators. and people in other sectors of society."

Why is this so incredible? In the past, to join your data to another data set, you had to spend some time downloading and formatting that data set sometimes you had to add additional fields and populate them, before that data set was usable in your GIS. But the bottom line is that you now have access to data sets in the cloud, for example, in the Living Atlas of World. And, similar to the capabilities included in the Enrichment tool, these data sets do not have to be on your own device or in your own geodatabase to use them!

Additionally, you now have the capability of making choropleth maps from tabular data using the Join Features option. Let’s say you have a CSV (comma separated value) table containing data for a set of polygons, such as ZIP codes in a state, or US states, or world countries. If you add that table to ArcGIS and make a map out of it, your result will be a set of points , one for each record in your table. If your table represents world countries, your map will show one point in each country. This is a useful exercise if you are teaching about geocoding in a GIS course but not so useful if your goal is to obtain a choropleth map on specific variables for your desired set of polygons. In the past, your choices at this stage would be to use Esri Maps for Office to turn your table into a set of polygons in ArcGIS , or to use ArcMap or ArcGIS Pro to join your table to a table associated with an existing shapefile or geodatabase. But now you can also use ArcGIS to create a choropleth map!

How can you do this? You can do this via the Join Tables tool and by accessing the Living Atlas of the World. First, log into your account in ArcGIS . Then > Map > Modify Map > Add Data. Add your spreadsheet. Need a spreadsheet? The World Bank has a wide variety of data sets by country in tabular form. Indicate the field (such as country code) for your place-based table, and the result will be a set of points, similar to that below (shown on the colored pencil base map, which I love):

That is all good, but now for the really exciting part: To make a choropleth map by country of this same data: Perform Analysis > Join Features, on step 1, select Choose Living Atlas Analysis Layer, and for step 2, choose your table, which now resides in ArcGIS as a layer, and join on a common field. In this example, I had no common field, so I first had to add a field in Excel for the 2 digit ISO country code and populate that field with the code. Why? Because the ISO 2 digit code did not exist in the World Bank table. This is a good example of knowing your data and what you need to sometimes do to enable joins to take place.

While running the Join Features tool, select the Living Atlas, search for World Countries, and choose World Countries, as shown below:

Therefore, you are joining your agricultural land table (#2) to the World Countries (Generalized) from the Living Atlas, as shown below:

Indicate the fields that will serve as your join fields, as I have done below. I will be joining on the 2 digit ISO code. When possible, join on a code rather than names (of cities, countries, and so on) due to spelling differences, which will adversely affect your match rate.

The result is a map joined to your original table! Now, with the map at your fingertips, you can map any of your table attributes, such as agricultural land by country for 2015, as I have done below.

Now let's dig a little deeper. Since we are working with agricultural land over time, we can create a custom Arcade expression that will allow us to visualize changes around the world. I created a custom expression below, subtracting the 1980 percent agricultural land by country by the percent in 2015, as shown below. Since the data are already in percent, there was no need to multiple by 100 (again, knowing your data is key!):

I also want the popup to display the change over time, and so I will add the same expression shown above to the popup custom attribute display, as shown below:

The resulting map and popup are shown here. What patterns do you notice? Why the big increase in Saudi Arabia, for example? You could zoom in, change the basemap to imagery, and investigate the new center pivot irrigated fields in the middle of that country. You could pan over to Brazil and examine fields reclaimed from wetlands and rainforest. You could examine urban spawl in the USA and elsewhere as part of your investigation into why agricultural land has declined in many areas of the world. Because I believe a data set like this is valuable to teach many core themes in environmental science, economics, and physical and cultural geography, I have shared the table here.

For more information about the Living Atlas, explore it here. For more information about the Join tool in ArcGIS , examine this document.


CPT desktop workflows

ArcGIS Desktop provides a variety of deployment options to satisfy your specific business needs. Selecting the right deployment option for each specific user workflow is the primary role of your system design process.

Figure A-2.2 shows the CPT Calculator ArcGIS Desktop software technology selection.

ArcGIS Desktop workflow performance targets are generated from the CPT Calculator tab.

  • Software selections include workstation (wkstn) and Windows Terminal Server (Citrix) workflow architecture patterns (options include direct connect, feature service (with and without client feature caching), and imagery data sources).
  • ArcGIS Desktop includes ArcMap or Pro client application.
  • Map display can be 2D or 3D graphics representation.
  • Density can be vector only or raster image data source.
  • Density/Portal VP and RP selections activate registered portal workflows.
  • Light, medium, heavy, 2xMedium, 3xMedium, 4xMedium, 5xMedium, …, 10xMedium display complexity settings provide a full range of potential workflow performance targets.
  • DeskDefault display resolution is 1920x1080 pixels.
  • Wkstn and Citrix FSvc software selections include ArcGIS Server feature service data source.

Software workflow recipe

The CPT Calculator generates a workflow recipe in cell A3 that identifies the selected Software Technology and Performance Parameters.

  • Software technology selection establishes a workflow profile based on a technology baseline.
  • CPT performance factor selections include software, Desktop, Graphics, density, complexity, %DataCache, resolution, and output. These are the primary workflow performance variables identified during Esri benchmark testing.
  • Changes in the software performance parameters will change the workflow performance targets (service times) based on technology baselines and key parameters established during performance benchmark testing.

ArcGIS Desktop Standard Workflows

Figure A-2.3 shows the ArcGIS Desktop workflow patterns available on the CPT Workflow tab. The Workflow tab is the Excel performance target look-up table used for CPT Design.

The most common ArcGIS Desktop workflow patterns are pre-generated from the Calculator tab and included on the Workflow tab as Standard Workflows. Standard workflows are provided for ArcGIS Desktop Workstation and Citrix deployment patterns. Citrix is a generic term used to represent a variety of supported remote desktop deployment patterns.

ArcGIS Desktop (ArcMap) Workstation Standard Workflows.
  • AGD wkstn ArcMap 2D V Med 100%Dyn 19x10 Feature. Use for simple ArcMap 2D user desktop workflows. Display and database design follow best practice performance guidelines.
  • AGD wkstn ArcMap 2D V Hvy 100%Dyn 19x10 Feature. Use for standard ArcMap 2D loads that support typical business workflows. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow.
  • AGD wkstn FSvc ArcMap 2D VP Hvy 20%Dyn 19x10 Feature +$. Use for standard ArcMap 2D 20% dynamic Portal feature service user workflow loads with ArcGIS Server Data Store data source. Follow best practices for map display and database performance. Display includes mashup with cached tile basemap.
ArcGIS Desktop (ArcMap) Citrix Standard Workflows.

ArcGIS Desktop application is deployed on a centralized host platform server configuration accessed from a remote client display.

  • AGD Citrix ArcMap 2D V Med 100%Dyn 19x10 ICA. Use for simple ArcMap 2D user desktop workflows with vector only data source. Display and database design follow best practice performance guidelines.
  • AGD Citrix ArcMap 2D V Hvy 100%Dyn 19x10 ICA. Use for standard ArcMap 2D loads that support typical business workflows with vector only data source. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow.
  • AGD Citrix ArcMap 2D R Med 100%Dyn 19x10 ICA. Use for simple ArcMap 2D user desktop workflows map displays that include an imagery data layer. Display and database design follow best practice performance guidelines.
  • AGD Citrix ArcMap 2D R Hvy 100%Dyn 19x10 ICA. Use for standard ArcMap 2D loads that support typical business workflows with map displays that include an imagery data layer. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow.
ArcGIS Desktop (Pro) Workstation Standard Workflows.
  • AGD wkstn Pro 2D V Med 100%Dyn 19x10 Feature. Use for simple ArcGIS Pro 2D user desktop workflows. Display and database design follow best practice performance guidelines.
  • AGD wkstn Pro 2D V Hvy 100%Dyn 19x10 Feature. Use for standard ArcGIS Pro 2D user workflow loads. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow.
  • AGD wkstn$ FSvc Pro 2D VP Hvy 20%Dyn 19x10 Feature. Use for standard ArcGIS Pro 2D 20% dynamic Portal feature service user workflow loads with 80% client feature caching.
  • AGD wkstn FSvc Pro 2D VP Hvy 20%Dyn 19x10 Feature +$. Use for standard ArcMap 2D 20% dynamic Portal feature service user workflow loads with ArcGIS Server Data Store data source.
  • AGD wkstn$ FSvc Pro 3D VP Hvy 20%Dyn 19x10 Feature. Use for standard ArcGIS Pro 3D 20% dynamic Portal feature service user workflow loads with 80% client feature caching.
  • AGD wkstn Pro 3D V Hvy 100%Dyn 19x10 Feature. Use for standard ArcGIS Pro 3D user workflow loads. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow.

Heavier workflow recipes can be generated from the CPT Calculator and included in your project workflows.

ArcGIS Desktop (Pro) Citrix Standard Workflows.

ArcGIS Desktop application is deployed on a centralized host platform server configuration accessed from a remote client display.

  • AGD Citrix Pro 2D V Med 100%Dyn 19x10 ICA. Use for simple ArcGIS Pro 2D user desktop workflows with vector only data source. Display and database design follow best practice performance guidelines. Host server machine must include properly configured NVIDIA GRID video card.
  • AGD Citrix Pro 2D V Hvy 100%Dyn 19x10 ICA. Use for standard ArcGIS Pro 2D user workflow loads with vector only data source. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow. Host server machine must include properly configured NVIDIA GRID video card.
  • AGD Citrix Pro 2D R Med 100%Dyn 19x10 ICA. Use for simple ArcGIS Pro 2D user desktop workflows with map displays that include an imagery data layer. Display and database design follow best practice performance guidelines. Host server machine must include properly configured NVIDIA GRID video card.
  • AGD Citrix Pro 2D R Hvy 100%Dyn 19x10 ICA. Use for standard ArcGIS Pro 2D user workflow loads with map displays that include an imagery data layer. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow. Host server machine must include properly configured NVIDIA GRID video card.
  • AGD Citrix Pro 3D V Hvy 100%Dyn 19x10 ICA. Use for standard ArcGIS Pro 3D user workflow loads with vector only data source. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow. Host server machine must include properly configured NVIDIA GRID video card.
  • AGD Citrix Pro 3D R Hvy 100%Dyn 19x10 ICA. Use for standard ArcGIS Pro 3D user workflow loads with map displays that include an imagery data layer. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow. Host server machine must include properly configured NVIDIA GRID video card.

Heavier workflow recipes can be generated from the CPT Calculator and included in your project workflows.

CPT server workflows

ArcGIS Server includes a broad variety of web clients and service offerings developed to meet your specific workflow needs.

Figure A-2.4 shows the CPT Calculator ArcGIS Server software technology selections.

ArcGIS Server workflow performance targets are generated from the CPT Calculator tab.

  • ArcGIS Server provides a variety of web mapping applications and map service deployment patterns.
  • The CPT Calculator ArcGIS Server workflows generate map service performance targets for REST, KML, WMS, SOAP, KMZ, Portal and imagery deployment patterns.

ArcGIS Server standard workflows

Figure A-2.5 shows the ArcGIS Server workflow patterns available on the CPT Workflow tab.

The most common ArcGIS Server workflow patterns are pre-generated from the Calculator tab and included on the Workflow tab as Standard Workflows.

  • AGS REST 2D VP Hvy 100%Dyn 13x7 PNG24. Use for standard map display services with PNG24 output (transparent overlay) registered with a Portal for ArcGIS server. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow.
  • AGS REST 2D V Med 100%Dyn 13x7 PNG24. Use for simple map display services with PNG24 output (transparent overlay). Display and database design follow best practice performance guidelines.
  • AGS REST 2D V Hvy 100%Dyn 13x7 PNG24. Use for standard map display services with PNG24 output (transparent overlay). Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow.
  • AGS REST 2D V Hvy 100%Dyn 13x7 PNG24 +$. Use for standard map display services with PNG24 output (transparent overlay) with cached basemap. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow.
  • AGS REST 2D V Hvy 40%Dyn 13x7 PNG24 +$. Use for standard map display services with PNG24 output using dynamic business layers (40% dynamic) combined with a cached basemap. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow.
  • AGS REST 2D V Hvy 20%Dyn 13x7 Feature +$. Use for feature editing of a limited number of business layers (20% dynamic) registered with Portal for ArcGIS and combined with a cached base map. Processing loads are 50 percent more than medium complexity workflow.
  • AGS KML 2D V Hvy 100%Dyn 13x7 PNG24. Use for standard map display services using KML output capabilities.
  • AGS WMS 2D V Hvy 100%Dyn 13x7 PNG24. Use for standard map display services using WMS output capabilities.

Standard workflows provide a reasonable performance target for medium and heavy software deployment use-cases. In most cases, Standard Workflows provide performance targets with adequate margins for your design.

ArcGIS Server Image Services standard workflows

The most common ArcGIS Server Image Services workflow patterns are pre-generated from the Calculator tab and included on the Workflow tab as Standard Workflows.

  • AGS Imagery 2D R Lite 100%Dyn 19x10 JPEG. Use for image service workflow with pre-processed imagery files (single image). Appropriate when display service scales are aligned with source raster pyramids to avoid resampling or on-the-fly reprojections.
  • AGS Imagery 2D R Med 100%Dyn 19x10 JPEG. Use for standard imagery mosaic dataset workflow with on-the-fly processing. Resampling and on-the-fly reprojections with complex imagery data sets can increase complexity to heavy or higher processing loads.
  • AGS Imagery 2D R Hvy 100%Dyn 19x10 JPEG. Use for standard imagery mosaic dataset workflow with on-the-fly processing with imagery analysis. Resampling and on-the-fly reprojections with complex imagery data sets may increase complexity to higher processing loads.

CPT Mobile Workflows

Mobile GIS supports a range of mobile systems from lightweight devices to PDAs, laptops, smart phones, and tablets.

ArcGIS Windows Mobile Standard Workflows are generated from the CPT Calculator tab.

  • ArcGIS Mobile sample Standard Workflows include the ArcGIS Mobile client, the mobile synchronization service, and the mobile provisioning service.
  • Additional custom mobile workflows can be generated from the CPT Calculator tab based on the workflow software technology performance factors similar to the sample workflow recipe provided for the ArcGIS Mobile Standard Workflows.

Figure A-2.6 shows the ArcGIS Windows Mobile workflow patterns available on the CPT Workflow tab.

  • AGS ArcGIS Mobile synchronization service: Use for simple point or polygon edits that are synchronized with the server during edit operations. Workflow productivity should be adjusted to represent workflow edit loads.
  • AGS ArcGIS Mobile provisioning service: Use for simple local extent business layer downloads representing new job tasking. The basemap cache should be downloaded before going to the field. Workflow productivity should be adjusted to represent frequency of project data downloads.

ArcGIS Mobile standard workflow description

Figure A-2.7 shows the ArcGIS Mobile workflow descriptions. Each of the ArcGIS Mobile Standard Workflows include a Calculator recipe provided as the Workflow Description (column AB).

  • Wireless synchronization is limited to 10% of a medium complexity vector display (business layers for a simple edit operation). The mobile synchronization service uses a SOAP 2D medium complexity 10% Dynamic (limited to exchanging updated features streamed to client over SOAP interchange) with 1366x768 display.
  • The provisioning service downloads 100% of the business layers for each new project for the work area of extent (basemap layers should be loaded on the device before going into the field). The mobile provisioning service downloads 100% of the dynamic 2D vector display business layers using a SOAP web service connection.

Workflow service times should be generated based on specific workflow properties, providing a reasonable performance target for capacity planning. Workflow service times for a variety of other custom mobile applications can be generated from the CPT Calculator tab, similar to the ArcGIS Mobile demonstration.

CPT Geoprocessing services

A variety of ArcGIS analysis (Geoprocessing), generating map or imagery cache tiles, or performing data replication services all can be represented by batch processing loads. Geoprocessing services are executed as single threaded batch processes, consuming available resources with transaction response time = service time (no random arrival queue time). Geoprocessing services are compute intensive, and with properly configured servers each geoprocessing instance will consume available processor core resources during peak system loads.

Geoprocessing services are represented in the Capacity Planning Tool by setting the project workflow minimum think time (cell D6) equal to zero. Each instance of a workflow profile with minimum think time set to zero will perform as a batch process.

  • Number of users (cell A6) identifies number of concurrent batch processes.
  • Service loads can be distributed across multiple platform tier or assigned to a single tier (Cell A9).
  • Client processing load can be moved to application tier by selecting "Batch" in cell J15.

CPT Geoprocessing standard workflows

Figure A-2.9 shows the CPT geoprocessing standard workflow selections. Standard workflow selections can be used for geoprocessing instances executed on a single platform tier.

  • AGD Citrix GeoBatch. Geoprocessing load supported by the Citrix platform tier.
  • AGS SOC GeoBatch. Geoprocessing load supported by the GIS Server (SOC) platform tier.
  • AGS DBMS GeoBatch. Geoprocessing load supported by the DBMS platform tier.

CPT Geoprocessing workflow performance

Figure A-2.10 shows the AGS SOC GeoBatch standard workflow processing loads for a single instance selection.

  • Workflow tab is selected as the Workflow Source (cell C30).
  • AGS SOC GeoBatch is the workflow selection(cell E30).
  • Single instance processing load (cell A6) consumes a processor core on the Web/SOC platform tier (25% utilization on 4 core server) shown in cell H10.

Any workflow pattern can be used to generate a batch process. For example, a standard Web services with min think time = 0 (cell D6) can be used to generate map caching or geodatabase replication loads across a multiple machine architecture.

Project Workflow assignment (Standard Workflows)

Figure A-2.11 shows how to move a selected Standard Workflow on the CPT Workflow tab to your Project Workflow section, and how to identify a unique Project Workflow nickname for use in your design.

Standard Workflows located on the CPT Workflow tab represent the most common ArcGIS deployment patterns. The following procedure can be used to select a Standard Workflow and insert copied cells (insert a new workflow row) in your Project Workflow section.

  • Select and Copy the row containing the standard workflow you would like to use.
  • Select Row just below where you want to insert the new workflow in your Project Workflow section.
  • Insert Copied Cells to include a copy of the Standard Workflow in your Project Workflows.
  • Select workflow name in column A and add nickname followed by an underscore (WebMap_) to the new Project Workflow.

Once you have added the new Standard Workflow to your Project Workflow section and, included a nickname to make the workflow name unique, you are ready to use the new workflow in your CPT Design.


Creating Points from Tabular Data

ArcGIS can determine the location of addresses, for instance if you have a spreadsheet with address data. You need to have a steet layer formatted appropriately. ArcGIS will create a point at the location of each address. Clean data is essential.

  • Quick Tour of Geocoding Also, at the bottom of the left column there are some Tutorials on different aspects of geocoding.
  • Geocoding Toolbox: How to use the geocoding tools.

Three ways of getting an address locator:

  1. Locally-mounted address locator: Duke academic users can download a zip archive of North American locator files for 2019 for use on their local computer. There are some locator files for download included in the Esri Data & Maps product, under Streetmap North America. We also have 2013, 2014, 2019 address locators on the S: drive (scratch drive) available from the 12 computers in the Data and Visualization Services computer lab.
  2. Build-your-own address locator: You can make your own address locator from layers of streets or similar GIS layers.
  3. Cloud-based address locator: You will also be able to connect to the ArcGIS Online Geocoding service. Contact [email protected] to get an ArcGIS Online account and to ask about geocoding procedures.
    • there are limits on the number of address that the Duke account can geocode, and
    • the online geocode engine often produces a large number of false positives, so the effort of using a locally installed locator file will probably provide more accuracy.

Online help. You can plot your data that has coordinate information (latitude/longitude or any other coordinate system) into ArcGIS. The program plots the locations as points on your map.

You can open the table with the XY coordinates, then right-click on it in the Contents Pane in order to open the Make XY Event Layer tool.

COORDINATE SYSTEM (VERY IMPORTANT): In the Add XY dialog box, look at the coordinate system that ArcGIS is assuming your data is in before you click through to create your points.

The default will be whatever your data frame is already in. For instance, if your data frame uses NAD83 State Plane North Carolina Feet, then ArcGIS assumes your tabular coordinates are in feet, not degrees. If these are really Longitude (X) and Latitude (Y) coordinates in degrees, you must change your coordinate system to unprojected (geographic) coordinates, typically WGS84 (the last choice under Geographic. World).

Making a permanent GIS layer: The plotted points in the XY Event layer are just pointing back to your tabular data they don't represent a new layer. If you then need to use tools on the point layer, such as a Spatial Join, then you will first need to export it as a feature class (e.g., shapefile).

The output point feature layer created by this tool is temporary and will not persist after the session ends. You can export this event layer to a feature class (geodatabase layer or shapefile) by right clicking the layer's name in the Contents Pane, then Data . Export. this opens the Copy Features geoprocessing tool. You can also use the Feature to Point or Feature Class to Feature Class tools.


Project a set of coordinates - points from an excel into a shape file with unknown coordinate system (map-match)

I am trying to project a set of coordinates (points) from an excel, on top of a shape file (map) with an unknown coordinate system.

The excel file was created by first creating a map with some points in Google earth and then exported it into a .kml file and then created the excel.

The shape file was given to me ready for the project i am doing. Basically i am trying to map-match the two files and then join-relate them to get some additional information for my project.

Here is what i did step by step:

1. Open ArcMap (V.10.1) and right clicked 'Layers' and defined a Geographic Coordinate System 'WGS 1984'

2. Imported the "vista_nicosia_links.shp" (first attachment) and received a warning for unknown Spatial Reference (second attachment:Unknown_Spatial_Reference.jpg)

3. Exported the file into a shape file using 'the same coordinate system as the Data frame' option (third attachment:Export_Output.shp).

4.Now in the Properties->Source tab i can see the Geogra[hic Coordinate System to be GCS_WGS_1984 and the 'Extend' info are those in the forth attachment(Extend_Export_Output.jpg) having 7 digits on the left of the comma.

5.I closed and re-opened ArcMap and performed actions of Step 1

6. Then i added X,Y data from the excel file (fifth attachment: MAP V_5.3 Coordinates) and then right-click -> display X,Y data and specified the X and Y field. In the description of Input Coordinate System it was by default GCS_WGS_1984.

7.I exported the data into a .shp file (sixth attachment:Export_Output_2.shp) using 'the same coordinate system as the Data frame' option.

8.I re-opened ArcMap and repeated actions in step 1 and imported the two shape files i created in steps 3 and 7(Export_Output.shp and Export_Output_2.shp)

9. The two shape files are displayed in entirely different positions the one far away from the other. I noticed that in right click -> Properties -> Source tab-> 'Extent' area of the Export_Output i see that there are 7 digits on the left of the comma (forth attachment: Extend_Export_Output.jpg), where as in Export_Output_2 i see only 2 digits on the left of the comma (seventh attachment: Extend_Export_Output_2.jpg).

10. Then i tried to project both shape files (one at a time) from "ArcToolbox -> Data Management Tools -> Projections and Transformations -> Define Projection" into Projected Coordinate system 'WGS 1984 World Mercator' but nothing seems to change or happening. They are both re-projected at the same (initial) positions.

I also tried many other alternatives i found in the internet but didn't manage to sort this out.

It would be greatly appreciated if someone could help me to sort this out because i don't know what i am doing wrong and i am stacked at this point for quite a long now.


UVa GIS Resources

Through licensing provided by ITS, all UVa affiliates have access to Esri Enterprise tools. More information from Esri available here.

The GIS group also provides access to other software including open source, 3D, and remote sensing.

1. A computer running Windows (7 or 10 recommended, please see System Requirements). ArcGIS Pro is Windows only. Apple users must either boot to Windows (recommended), use The UVa Hive, or, as a last resort, run virtual Windows.

2. Administrative rights to computer.

3. Installation media which is downloadable through the UVa Software Gateway.

4. An ArcGIS Online Account . Creation of this account will enable an ArcGIS Pro license. Simply login to ArcGIS Pro using your ArcGIS Online account.

**If you already have an ArcGIS Online account that was created before 7/1/2019, p lease contact the Scholars' Lab GIS group with a request to enable ArcGIS Pro on your ArcGIS Online account.

1. Download and then open the executable ArcGIS Pro installation file from the UVa Software Gateway .

2. Proceed through the install process, using the ESRI Install instructions as a reference if necessary.

3. When first opening ArcGIS Pro, you will be prompted to login to ArcGIS Online. Click " ENTERPRISE LOGIN " .

***DO NOT enter a Username and Password in this dialogue. Doing so will not authorize through NetBadge, and will fail.

4. In the text box, enter " uvalibrary " and check the box next to Remember this URL. Then click Continue.

5. Click University of Virginia

6. Login to NetBadge as you normally would.

7. Before working in ArcGIS Pro, you'll need to create a project. the Blank project template is suggested to start, but feel free to play around with the different project templates.

It is highly recommended that you check for updates to ArcGIS Pro after creating your first project. ESRI regularly sends updates, so it's likely the version that was downloaded from the software gateway needs to be updated. To do so, click the Project tab, then click About . The About page will indicate if any updates are available. If so, click Update.

1. A computer running Windows (7 or 10 recommended). ArcGIS is Windows only. Mac users must either boot to Windows (recommended), use The UVa Hive, or, run Windows virtually (last resort).

2. Administrative rights to computer.

3. Installation media which is downloadable through the UVa Software Gateway .

4. UVa ArcGIS licensing server name. You will be required to enter the server name (server URL) during the installation process. The server name will be on your on line receipt from the Uva Software Gateway. Please make note of it!

5. Secure connection to UVa. No worries if you are on Grounds. If you are off Grounds, you must use a the UVa VPN (http://its.virginia.edu/network/vpn/ ) to access the license server.

Uninstall Older Versions (if necessary)

ArcGIS 10.x cannot run on a computer that has an older version of ArcGIS installed.

Using Add or Remove Programs from Windows Control Panel, remove any older version of ArcGIS AND ArcGIS License Manager.

If you do not remove older versions of ArcGIS before you begin this installation, it will be done automatically before ArcGIS 10 is installed. However, we have experienced issues with this in the past. It is better to remove the older version of ArcGIS before attempting to install ArcGIS 10.8.

1. Download the executable ArcGIS 10.8 installation file from UVa Software Gateway.

2. Double-click file to launch which extracts installation files to a directory.

3. When extraction complete, click Launch the setup program and click Close .

4. Click Next after reading other programs warning.

5. Accept license agreement and click Next .

6. Select Complete for setup type.

8. Accept default Destination Folder by clicking Next .

9. Accept default Python Destination Folder by clicking Next .

10. Click Install . Installation will take some time. Might be a good time for a coffee break.

11. Success! Hit the Finish button. This launches the ArcGIS Administration Wizard. You need the ArcGIS License Manager server name to continue.

12. Remember, the ArcGIS license server name from your UVa Software Gateway receipt in the portal (the server name is NOT on the emailed receipt).

13. Select Advanced (ArcInfo) Concurrent Use under number 1 and, under number 2 , select Define a license manager now and enter the server name in the box under choice .

14. Click OK . ArcGIS Administrator appears.

NOTE : The license manager allows for the check out of licenses for up to six months or July 30 (whichever is sooner). This can be of great value because you do not have to authenticate against the license server while you have licenses checked out. You will have to authenticate against the server to check in licenses or make changes.

15. To check out (borrow) a license, click Borrow/Return and put checks next to all the applications you wish to borrow. Click Apply .

These applications are now available to you for six months without any need to contact the server. You can return the licenses by unchecking the boxes.

Congratulations, you now have ArcGIS 10.5 should now be running on your computer.

17. If you plan on using any ArcGIS extensions like Spatial Analyst or 3D Analyst, you must turn them on prior to use or you will get an misleading error saying you do not have a license to use them. Click Customize > Extensions to get the Extensions dialog box. Check the boxes next to the extensions you wish to use.

NOTE : If you wish to be kept up to date on ArcGIS issues at UVA including annual license renewal, GIS events, and job postings you should join the GIS Users Collab site.

Checking Out Licenses

ArcGIS 10 supports license check-out. This means you can run ArcGIS without connecting to the internet and the UVA license server every time you start the software. This is particularly useful when traveling without a reliable internet connection. The ArcGIS license you check out is good for 6 months or until July 31, whichever is sooner.

Here are the steps to check out your licenses:

1. Be sure ArcGIS is not running.

2. If you are on grounds, go to Step 3. If you are off grounds you&rsquoll need to run UVA Anywhere VPN before going to Step 3. Instructions here:http://its.virginia.edu/network/vpn/ .

3. Go to Start / All Programs / ArcGIS / ArcGIS Administrator.

4. In the left panel click on the folder &ldquoBorrow/Return&rdquo. After clicking on the folder, some users report getting the message &ldquoThe server is not configured&hellip&rdquo. It may take several tries clicking Borrow/Return until you do not see that message. Be sure you see a screen that looks like this before you continue:

5. Check ALL the empty boxes and click OK.

6. You&rsquoll see &ldquoAttempting to Borrow/Return&hellip&rdquo (the software is checking out your new licenses and will take a few minutes to complete)

7. When complete the ArcGIS Administrator will close and you can start ArcGIS without an internet connection. Your licenses are valid for another 6 months or until July 31, whichever is sooner.

8. About 30 days before your licenses are due to expire, you will receive warning messages each time you start ArcGIS reminding you to renew your ArcGIS Licenses. Follow the instructions here for "Renewing your ArcGIS License".

9. Join the UVA GIS Users Collab site to be kept up to date on ArcGIS issues at UVA including annual license renewal, GIS events, and job postings: https://collab.itc.virginia.edu/portal/site/84979808-9f4a-4777-af44-75ad46826c4f

Contact a GIS Specialist listed at the right of this page with any questions.

Refresh Licenses

If you have checked out licenses and are seeing warnings about license expiration, follow the instructions below to renew your licenses.

The ArcGIS license you check out is good for 6 months or until July 30 each year, whichever is sooner. As you near the end of your license period you will see warnings each time you start ArcGIS.

Here are the steps to renew your license:

1. Be sure ArcGIS is not running.

2. If you are on grounds, go to Step 3. If you are off grounds you&rsquoll need to run UVA Anywhere VPN before going to Step 3. Instructions here:http://its.virginia.edu/network/vpn/ .

3. Go to Start / All Programs / ArcGIS / ArcGIS Administrator.

4. In the left panel click on the folder &ldquoBorrow/Return&rdquo. After clicking on the folder, some users report getting the message &ldquoThe server is not configured&hellip&rdquo. It may take several tries clicking Borrow/Return until you do not see that message. Be sure you see a screen that looks like this before you continue:

5. Uncheck all the boxes under "Borrowed" and click &ldquoOK&rdquo. You&rsquoll see &ldquoAttempting to Borrow/Return&hellipPlease wait&hellip&rdquo

6. Wait (it&rsquos checking in all your old licenses). When the process completes ArcGIS Administrator will close.

7. Open ArcGIS Administrator again and click on Borrow/Return. It will now look like this:

7. Check ALL the empty boxes and click OK.

8. You&rsquoll see &ldquoAttempting to Borrow/Return&hellip&rdquo (it&rsquos checking out your new licenses and will take a few minutes)

9. When complete the ArcGIS Administrator will close and you can start ArcGIS without warning messages. Your licenses have been renewed for another 6 months or until July 31, whichever is sooner.

10. Join the UVA GIS Users Collab site to be kept up to date on ArcGIS issues at UVA including annual license renewal, GIS events, and job postings: UVa GIS Users.

Create an ArcGIS Online Account

Anyone affiliated with the University can use the University's enterprise ArcGIS Online site for creating and hosting data, maps, applications, and more.

That's it! By logging in through Netbadge, your account has been created.

Accessing ArcGIS Online Resources

NOTE: This guide assumes that you already have an account on our Enterprise ArcGIS Online site. If that's not the case. please follow the above instructions, Create an ArcGIS Online Account, to create an account.

When accessing ArcGIS Online resources that are outside our Enterprise URL of uvalibrary.maps.arcgis.com , it is necessary to specify the organization you are a member of. When signing on, you may be prompted for a username and password. It is important to note that using this prompt will fail. The only way to access your UVA ArcGIS Online account is through our Enterprise login using Netbadge.

1. When presented with the login page below, click ENTERPRISE LOGIN.

2. Type "uvalibrary" into the text box for the organization URL. Check the box next to Remember this URL, then click CONTINUE.

3. Click UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA . This will forward you to Netbadge.

4. Login to Netbadge as normal. That's it!

QGIS is the best open source desktop GIS application available. Those familiar with ArcMap will find the QGIS interface familiar. One of the great advantages to QGIS is that in can run on Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems.

QGIS is available on computer stations in the Scholars' Lab and most University Lab and Classroom computers.

Through a license held by the Department of Environmental Science, the UVa community has access to ENVI, a remote sensing program by Harris Geospatial. Gaining access to ENVI must be arranged with administrators in EVSC. Please contact us for more help.

While not a powerhouse dedicated program, ESRI's desktop GIS does provide some image analysis tools. Please see following link for more information.

Google Earth often is not considered a GIS. However, it has some great advantages. It's free. It's runs on many operationg systems. It's easy to use. What can you do with it? Load historic maps from premier map collectors. Add your own points, lines and polygon layers. View 3D buildings. We are happy to show you all the cool things Google Earth can do.

Please Note, this guide is for users that are having issues licensing ArcGIS Pro through NetBadge. Please do not use License Manager with Pro if you're not having issues connecting through NetBadge.

This issue is inconsistent and appears to be random. If you are working with Pro on your own computer, close and reopen Pro and try again. If you're working on The Hive, log off your Hive session, open a new Hive session, and try again. If that doesn't work, continue with the instructions listed below.

1. You will need a secure connection to UVa. No worries if you are on Grounds or on The Hive. If Pro is installed on your computer and you are off Grounds, you must use the UVa VPN to a ccess the license server.

3. At the ArcGIS Sign In screen, click Configure your Licensing Options.

4. On the Licensing window, set Licensing Type to Concurrent Use License. Enter "lm2.license.virginia.edu" for the License Manager, then either hit enter, or click Refresh. Check any necessary extensions (optional) and click OK. Restart Pro and you should be all set.

Note: Pro is automatically licensed, and most geoprocessing tools will work without checking any boxes. However, feel free to c heck the box next to extensions you may need. It's fine to check all the boxes, though most will only need Spatial Analyst if anything.

Hive Note: Logging out of the Hive will delete your session information, including these settings, so if you Log Out, you'll need to repeat these steps. If you Disconnect (click the "X" or Edit > Disconnect), your session is maintained, at least for a few hours, perhaps longer.


Use proximity

These tools help you answer one of the most common questions posed in spatial analysis: What is near what?

A buffer is an area that covers a given distance from a point, line, or area feature.

Buffers are typically used to create areas that can be further analyzed using a tool such as Overlay Layers . For example, if the question is What buildings are within 1 mile of the school?, the answer can be found by creating a 1-mile buffer around the school and overlaying the buffer with the layer containing building footprints. The end result is a layer of those buildings within 1 mile of the school.

  • Where can I go from here within a 30-minute drive?
  • Where can I go from here within a 30-minute drive at 5:30 p.m. during rush hour?
  • What areas of town can the fire department reach within 5 minutes?
  • How would fire-response coverage improve by building a new fire station here?
  • What market areas does my business cover?

You may be able to answer your questions solely through visualizing the output areas. Alternatively, you can perform further spatial analysis using the output areas. For instance, running Aggregate Points using drive-time areas with demographic data can help determine which potential store location would likely provide the best customer base for your type of business.

To use this tool, your portal administrator must configure network utility services on the portal and grant you the Network Analysis privilege.

This tool finds the nearest features and, optionally, reports and ranks the distance to the nearby features. To find what's nearby, the tool can either measure straight-line distance or a selected travel mode. There are options to limit the number of nearest features to find or the search range in which to find them.

  • What is the nearest park from here?
  • Which hospital can I reach in the shortest drive time? How long would the trip take on a Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. during rush hour?
  • What are the road distances between these major cities?
  • Which of these patients reside within 2 miles of these chemical plants?

Find Nearest returns a layer containing the nearest features and, optionally, a line layer that links the start locations to their nearest locations. The optional line layer contains information about the start and nearest locations and the distances between.

To allow you to find nearby features using most of the available travel modes, your inputs must be point features and your portal administrator must configure network utility services for the portal and grant you the Network Analysis privilege. You can, however, measure by Line Distance without this privilege.

Plan Routes determines how to efficiently divide tasks among a mobile workforce.

You provide the tool with a set of stops and the number of vehicles available to visit the stops. The tool assigns the stops to vehicles and returns routes showing how each vehicle can reach their assigned stops in the least amount of time.

  • Inspect homes, restaurants, or construction sites.
  • Provide repair, installation, or technical services.
  • Deliver items and small packages.
  • Make sales calls.
  • Transport people from their homes to an event.

The output from Plan Routes includes a layer of stops coded by the routes to which they are assigned, a layer of routes showing the shortest paths to visit assigned stops, and, depending on whether any stops could not be reached, a layer of unassigned stops.

To use this tool, your portal administrator must configure network utility services on the portal and grant you the Network Analysis privilege.

This tool measures the travel time or distance between pairs of points. The tool can report straight-line distances, road distances, or travel times. You provide starting and ending points, and the tool returns a layer containing route lines, including measurements, between the paired origins and destinations. If many origins go to one destination, a table summarizing multiple trips to the destination is included in the output.

To use this tool, your portal administrator must configure network utility services on the portal and grant you the Network Analysis privilege.


Tapestry Segment summaries

The 67 distinct markets of Tapestry detail the diversity of the American population. Grouping the segments can simplify these differences by summarizing markets that share similar traits. There are 14 LifeMode groups and 6 Urbanization groups.

LifeMode groups

LifeMode groups represent markets that share a common experience—born in the same generation or immigration from another country—or a significant demographic trait, like affluence. Tapestry Segments are classified into 14 LifeMode groups. Click a link to view a PDF summary:

  • Established wealth—educated, well-traveled married couples
  • Accustomed to "more": less than 10% of all households, with 20% of household income
  • Homeowners (almost 90%), with mortgages (65.2%)
  • Married couple families with children ranging from grade school to college
  • Expect quality invest in time-saving services
  • Participate actively in their communities
  • Active in sports and enthusiastic travelers
  • Prosperous married couples living in older suburban enclaves
  • Ambitious and hard-working
  • Homeowners (70%) prefer denser, more urban settings with older homes and a large share of townhomes
  • A more diverse population, primarily married couples, many with older children
  • Financially responsible, but still indulge in casino gambling and lotto tickets
  • Serious shoppers, from Nordstrom's to Marshalls or DSW, that appreciate quality, and bargains
  • Active in fitness pursuits like bicycling, jogging, yoga, and hiking
  • Subscribe to premium movie channels like HBO and Starz
  • Young, successful singles in the city
  • Intelligent (best educated market), hard-working (highest rate of labor force participation) and averse to traditional commitments of marriage and home ownership
  • Urban denizens, partial to city life, high-rise apartments and uptown neighborhoods
  • Prefer credit cards over debit cards, while paying down student loans
  • Green and generous to environmental, cultural and political organizations
  • Internet dependent, from social connections to shopping for fashion, tracking investments, making travel arrangements, and watching television and movies
  • Adventurous and open to new experiences and places
  • Successful young families in their first homes
  • Non-diverse, prosperous married-couple families, residing in suburban or semirural areas with a low vacancy rate (second lowest)
  • Homeowners (79%) with mortgages (second highest %), living in newer single-family homes, with median home value slightly higher than the U.S.
  • Two workers in the family, contributing to the second highest labor force participation rate, as well as low unemployment
  • Do-it-yourselfers, who work on home improvement projects, as well as their lawns and gardens
  • Sports enthusiasts, typically owning newer sedans or SUVs, dogs, and savings accounts/plans, comfortable with the latest technology
  • Eat out frequently at fast food or family restaurants to accommodate their busy lifestyle
  • Especially enjoy bowling, swimming, playing golf, playing video games, watching movies rented via Redbox, and taking trips to a zoo or theme park
  • Gen X in middle age families with fewer kids and a mortgage
  • Second largest Tapestry group, comprised of Gen X married couples, and a growing population of retirees
  • About a fifth of residents are 65 or older about a fourth of households have retirement income
  • Own older single-family homes in urban areas, with 1 or 2 vehicles
  • Live and work in the same county, creating shorter commute times
  • Invest wisely, well-insured, comfortable banking online or in person
  • News junkies (read a daily newspaper, watch news on TV, and go online for news)
  • Enjoy reading, renting movies, playing board games and cards, doing crossword puzzles, going to museums and rock concerts, dining out, and walking for exercise
  • Empty nesters in bucolic settings
  • Largest Tapestry group, almost half of households located in the Midwest
  • Homeowners with pets, residing in single-family dwellings in rural areas almost 30% have 3 or more vehicles and, therefore, auto loans
  • Politically conservative and believe in the importance of buying American
  • Own domestic trucks, motorcycles, and ATVs/UTVs
  • Prefer to eat at home, shop at discount retail stores (especially Walmart), bank in person, and spend little time online
  • Own every tool and piece of equipment imaginable to maintain their homes, vehicles, vegetable gardens, and lawns
  • Listen to country music, watch auto racing on TV, and play the lottery enjoy outdoor activities, such as fishing, hunting, camping, boating, and even bird watching
  • Established diversity—young, Hispanic homeowners with families
  • Multilingual and multigenerational households feature children that represent second-, third- or fourth-generation Hispanic families
  • Neighborhoods feature single-family, owner-occupied homes built at city's edge, primarily built after 1980
  • Hard-working and optimistic, most residents aged 25 years or older have a high school diploma or some college education

Shopping and leisure also focus on their children—baby and children's products from shoes to toys and games and trips to theme parks, water parks or the zoo

  • Lifestyles of thirtysomethings
  • Millennials in the middle: single/married, renters/homeowners, middle class/working class
  • Urban market mix of single-family, townhome, and multi-unit dwellings
  • Majority of residents attended college or attained a college degree
  • Householders have ditched their landlines for cell phones, which they use to listen to music (generally contemporary hits), read the news, and get the latest sports updates of their favorite teams
  • Online all the time: use the Internet for entertainment (downloading music, watching YouTube, finding dates), social media (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn), search for employment
  • Leisure includes night life (clubbing, movies), going to the beach, some travel and hiking
  • Senior lifestyles reveal the effects of saving for retirement
  • Households are commonly married empty nesters or singles living alone homes are single-family (including seasonal getaways), retirement communities, or high-rise apartments
  • More affluent seniors travel and relocate to warmer climates less affluent, settled seniors are still working toward retirement
  • Cell phones are popular, but so are landlines
  • Many still prefer print to digital media: Avid readers of newspapers, to stay current
  • Subscribe to cable television to watch channels like Fox News, CNN, and The Weather Channel
  • Residents prefer vitamins to increase their mileage and a regular exercise regimen
  • Country life with older families in older homes
  • Rustic Outposts depend on manufacturing, retail and healthcare, with pockets of mining and agricultural jobs
  • Low labor force participation in skilled and service occupations
  • Own affordable, older single-family or mobile homes vehicle ownership, a must
  • Residents live within their means, shop at discount stores and maintain their own vehicles (purchased used) and homes
  • Outdoor enthusiasts, who grow their own vegetables, love their pets and enjoy hunting and fishing
  • Technology is cost prohibitive and complicated. Pay bills in person, use the yellow pages, read newspapers, magazines, and mail-order books
  • Millennials on the move—single, diverse, urban
  • Millennials seeking affordable rents in apartment buildings
  • Work in service and unskilled positions, usually close to home or public transportation
  • Single parents depend on their paycheck to buy supplies for their very young children
  • Midtown Singles embrace the Internet, for social networking and downloading content
  • From music and movies to soaps and sports, radio and television fill their lives
  • Brand savvy shoppers select budget friendly stores
  • Growing up and staying close to home single householders
  • Close knit urban communities of young singles (many with children)
  • Owners of old, single-family houses, or renters in small multi-unit buildings
  • Religion is the cornerstone of many of these communities
  • Visit discount stores and clip coupons, frequently play the lottery at convenience stores
  • Canned, packaged and frozen foods help to make ends meet
  • Purchase used vehicles to get them to and from nearby jobs
  • Urban denizens, young, diverse, hard-working families
  • Extremely diverse with a Hispanic majority, the highest among LifeMode groups
  • A large share are foreign born and speak only their native language
  • Young, or multigenerational, families with children are typical
  • Most are renters in older multi-unit structures, built in the 1960s or earlier
  • Hard-working with long commutes to jobs, often utilizing public transit to commute to work
  • Spending reflects the youth of these consumers, focus on children (top market for children's apparel) and personal appearance
  • Also a top market for movie goers (second only to college students) and fast food
  • Partial to soccer and basketball
  • College and military populations that share many traits due to the transitional nature of this LifeMode Group
  • Highly mobile, recently moved to attend school or serve in military
  • The youngest market group, with a majority in the 15 to 24 year old range
  • Renters with roommates in nonfamily households
  • For many, no vehicle is necessary as they live close to campus, military base or jobs
  • Fast-growing group with most living in apartments
  • Part-time jobs help to supplement active lifestyles
  • Millennials are tethered to their phones and electronic devices, typically spending over 5 hours online every day tweeting, blogging, and consuming media
  • Purchases aimed at fitness, fashion, technology and the necessities of moving
  • Highly social, free time is spent enjoying music, being out with friends, seeing movies
  • Try to eat healthy, but often succumb to fast food

Urbanization groups

Tapestry groups are also available as Urbanization summary groups, in which markets share similar locales, from the urban canyons of the largest cities to the rural lanes of villages or farms. Tapestry Segments are classified into 6 Urbanization groups. Click a link to view a PDF summary:

  • Young, mobile, diverse populations living in the most densely populated neighborhoods of the largest cities (populations of 2.5 million or more)
  • Traits shared by more than 2.5 million people: crowding, high cost of living, and full access to urban amenities, including jobs
  • Youngest, most diverse populations among the Urbanization groups
  • Households are renter occupied by singles or roommates
  • The most challenging market for auto sales: half the commuters use public transportation, bicycles or walk to work
  • Focus on style and image with liberal spending on apparel
  • Constantly connected, using the Internet for everything from finding jobs to finding dates
  • City life for starting families in neighborhoods that fringe major cities
  • The earliest suburbs, built before 1970, primarily single-family housing with some apartments
  • Young families with children, diverse population
  • Homeowners living closer to the city, with below average vacancy rates
  • Leisure focuses on the children (visits to theme parks or water parks), sports (soccer, basketball, football) and movies
  • Spending also emphasizes the children—clothing, toys and baby products
  • Parents of small children favor family restaurants and fast food
  • Smartphones are popular, for social contacts, downloading apps, games and music
  • Affordable city life including smaller metropolitan cities or satellite cities that feature a mix of single-family and multiunit housing
  • Single householders seeking affordable living in the city: usually multi-unit buildings that range from mid- to high-rise apartments average monthly rents and home value below the U.S. average
  • Consumers include college students, affluent Gen X couples, and retirement communities
  • Student loans more common than mortgages debit cards more popular than credit cards
  • Residents share an interest in city life and its amenities, from dancing and clubbing to museums and concerts
  • Convenience and mobility favor cell phones over landlines
  • Many residents rely upon the Internet for entertainment (download music, play online games) and as a useful resource (job searches)
  • Urban expansion: affluence in the suburbs or city-by-commute
  • The most populous and fast-growing among Urbanization groups, Suburban Periphery includes one-third of the nation's population
  • Commuters value low density living, but demand proximity to jobs, entertainment and the amenities of an urban center
  • Well-educated, two-income households, accept long commute times to raise their children in these family-friendly neighborhoods. Many are heavily mortgaged in newly built, single-family homes
  • Older householders have either retired in place, downsized or purchased a seasonal home
  • Suburbanites are the most affluent group, working hard to lead bright, fulfilled lives
  • Residents invest for their future, insure themselves against unforeseen circumstances, but also enjoy the fruits of their labor
  • The most affordable housing—in smaller towns and communities located throughout the country
  • Single-family and mobile homes in the country, but still within reach of some amenities
  • Embrace a quiet, country lifestyle including listening to country music, attending country performances, riding ATVs, and camping
  • Prefer domestic products and vehicles, especially trucks
  • Shop at large department and discount stores like Walmart
  • Fast food and frozen meals are much more common than fine dining
  • Many make a living off the land through agriculture, fishing and forestry
  • Time off is spent visiting nearby family rather than flying to vacation destinations
  • When services are needed, the yellow pages are within reach
  • Country living featuring single-family homes with acreage, farms and rural resort areas
  • Very low population density distinguishes this group—typically less than 50 people per square mile
  • Over half of all households are occupied by persons 55 years and older many are married couples without children at home
  • The least diverse group, with over 80% non-Hispanic White
  • Mostly home owners (80%) , but rentals are affordable in single-family or mobile homes
  • Long trips to the store and to work---often drive alone in trucks or SUVs, listening to country radio
  • Blue collar jobs dominate the landscape including manufacturing, agriculture, mining and construction
  • Many are self-employed, retired, or receive income from Social Security
  • Satellite TV and landline phones are necessary means to connect
  • More conservative in their spending practices and beliefs
  • Comfortable, established and not likely to move

"Duplicate field names not allowed"

Trying to import a csv from excel into ArcGis where one column is zipcodes, one is number of X per zipcode. ArcGis keeps telling me there's an error when I import because "duplicate field names are not allowed". Does anyone experience this ever or have any ideas?

Without knowing more details--check that your fieldnames are less than 10 characters and unique. If you have fieldnames that start with similar strings like "FIELDNAME_1" and "FIELDNAME_2" then ArcGIS might be shortening them to "FIELDNAME_" and reading them as identical.

*When I say "unique" I mean "not remotely similar"

Tried changing them a bunch, do you think it has to do with being a sheet on a multi sheet excel workbook? Even though when I save it as a csv it only saves the active sheet….should i try copy and pasting this one sheet into a new excel save it as csv and see if it works?

Does the CSV have the same header for multiple fields?

No, that’s what I don’t understand

When you say "ArcGIS", are you talking about ArcMap, ArcGIS Pro or ArcGIS Online? Also, what tools / workflow are you using to perform the import?

ArcGis Online I believe, I am doing their 21 day educational trial to see if GIS is something I’d like to use on a research project I’m working on. I have a multi sheet excel book and I’m trying to overlay two of the sheets. I have them each saved as a csv for that specific sheet on the excel, and the first one uploaded just fine as a csv from excel, but the second wont.


Does ArcGIS Pro join to excel worksheets like ArcMap does? - Geographic Information Systems

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Create a new map in seconds by adding layers in the Map Viewer. You can use your own data combined with layers from ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World.


Watch the video: Importing an excel file and adding fields in ArcGIS Pro.